Author Archives: joren

Computer user interface – beyond Intellectual Property?

Microsoft announced that it opened up the core code of its Kinect motion-sensing device. This is a very interesting development in the light of recent decisions on whether Intellectual Property protection applies to computer – user interfaces. In other words, does Intellectual Property apply to how we talk to computers? Back in 2010, when Microsoft Read more …

Is there Intellectual Property in Money?

Usually, the question is asked the other way around: “is there money in Intellectual Property?” But as technology is creating new kinds of currencies and new ways to pay, the question of Intellectual Property Rights in money becomes relevant. 1. New money Amazon has recently started issuing its own currency, called Amazon Coins. Amazon creates Read more …

3D printing and Intellectual Property – why are they a misfit?

In my previous post I explained how 3D printing affects the world of Intellectual Property (IP), and how this creates all kinds of problems for IP rights. In this blog I will expand a little bit on why that is the case, and whether something can be done about it. 1. Personalized manufacturing Remember the Read more …

3D-printing and Intellectual Property

Since my last blog post (two years ago) a lot has changed. The technology of 3D-printing has made great progress. And the world of Intellectual Property has started to react to the challenge posed by 3D-printing. Which, in turn, has caused a surprise reaction by the 3D-printing community.   1. What is 3D-printing? Although 3D-printing Read more …

EpiGaN

EpiGaN is a spinoff of IMEC, the world-leading research institution in nano-electronics and nano-technology. EpiGaN focuses on providing world-leading III-nitride epitaxial material wafer solutions to manufacturers of top-performance power-management and RF semiconductors. EpiGaN gives device manufacturers early access to a unique and proven power-management technology to be applied in key market segments such as power Read more …

Does Apple need Creative Commons to survive?

The launch of the mini iPad seems to make Apple a follower, instead of a leader. Apple’s use of Intellectual Property is probably a prime cause of the Apple slowdown. But a novel approach to IP – access to the Creative Commons – could help Apple to turn around and be innovative again.   Apple Read more …

Twitspark

Twitspark is a startup offering CRM services through social media (Twitter). Davy Kestens, the CEO, did a very successful round of financing, with investors from Belgium and Silicon Valley. Prior to that, and as part of that exercise, I helped Davy in respect of the transfer of IP to the business, and more particularly fiscal Read more …

Djengo

Djengo, a startup that provides carpooling services, launched back in 2011, and secured 0.5m euros in funding in 2012. We helped them structure their Intellectual Property and ensure they had all necessary rights at the right place in the business at the time of the financing round.

Why criminalizing IP infringement does not work

Criminal law demands high standards of evidence and due process. IP infringement cases repeatedly fall short of those standards. Using criminal law to protect private monopolistic interests is counter effective.   Japan has recently issued a new draconian law  criminalizing “illegal” downloads. A single download can get you 2 years in jail, or fines up Read more …

Copyright in the digital age: the UK’s “Digital Copyright Exchange feasibility study” analyzed.

In earlier blogs, I have analyzed why the current copyright system is not fit for the digital age. I have also provided some elements of a solution; one key element I see for any survival of the copyright system is to impose a system of registration, together with breaking down the power to withhold legal Read more …